Sunday, May 13, 2012

Don't Have Sex Until You're 12


Maybe you’re there because you’ve grown out of your favorite cocktail dress, or because you’ve recently realized that you only have 12 pairs of summer sandals, or, as most teenagers strolling past you, you’re simply bored out of your skull on a hot Houston Saturday. But regardless of your reason, you and your fellow shoppers all come across the same things on your journey through the linoleum walkways: A Victoria’s Secret model swooning as she gracefully arches her back. A shirtless guy and girl rolling around in the sand on a Hollister billboard. Leonard DeCaprio clutching a Rolex as he stares you down. A close up of the lips of a Sephora model as she seductively licks a lollipop.

Who needs Maxim when you have the Galleria?

As contraceptives gained popularity and the world became more liberal, the subject of sex progressively pulled out (haha) of the shadows. Sex was no longer an activity restricted to the married population, but a subject common enough for table-talk, enjoyed and giggled at by all. Teenagers obsessed over it, twenty-somethings bragged about it, and the older generation laughed about it.
Realizing this, advertising companies starting using sex as their main sales pitch. For guys: Use Axe body spray, you’ll be chased by a band of girls. Buy McDonald’s chicken nuggets for a hot chick, she will screw you on the counter. Drink Fanta, 4 skimpily-dressed girls will start dancing on the hood of your car. When I was leaving the airport in Rome, I even saw a billboard of a completely topless girl advertising what appeared to be car insurance. For girls: Use Someday perfume, Justin Bieber will teleport to your room. Buy Secret antiperspirant, you will be hit on by every guy at a club. Eat Yoplait yogurt, you will shrink 40 pants sizes and men will propose to you on the spot. Hell, you probably decided to read this article because of the title.

Sex is now everywhere, but sadly this bombardment of boobs and Ryan Reynolds not only holds our attention, but also that of the even-younger generation. Personally, I have no problem with kids being educated about sex when they are of age, but when I found out that my 11 year old cousin knows what road-head is, I started to worry.   
The danger of exposing the youth to the world of sex is that it has the biggest influence on them. This early exposure has increased the demand for certain commercialized products, yes, but it has also had many negative effects. Like what?
Think back to when you were 12. Sex was like a secret club, a worldwide phenomenon catered to by the media that you were missing out on. But no one likes to miss out. The earlier we expose kids to sex, the earlier their patience for being excluded will run out, and this time may come before they are educated on the proper methods of protection and contraception. I agree, to an extent, with the older generation’s views that sex should be an activity reserved for adults, or, as I frame it, those who are mature enough and psychologically ready. Some are ready at 16, some at 22, but never 12. Yes, there are mature 12 years olds, but you can probably count them on your right hand, and I still doubt that any of them would be able to face the implications of the activity, which I won’t go into right this minute, or be able to indulge in it safely.

However, despite the negative effects of sex-infused advertisement, I doubt that any major company is going to change their advertising techniques or that Victoria’s Secret models will start posing in burkas. But I think it would benefit everyone in the long run if they stopped relying on our basic instincts and became a little more prudish.




As usual, leave your thoughts in the comment section below if you wanna share them. If not, go eat a cookie. Maybe that will inspire you to indulge me with your opinions on the matter, and your day will greatly improve.


-Julia 

My name is Julia. I come from a family of pessimistic Russian Jews, and I love debating about social issues. Thanks for reading. If you liked it, leave a comment, share the blog with friends and all that jazz :)

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2 comments:

  1. At a future date, we must discuss the differing opinions on sex held by the writers for QBA. With such a diversity of opinions present, it would be a detrimental waste of easy attention-grabbing material.

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  2. Ryan Reynolds is to girls what boobs are to guys?
    ...Yeah, sounds about right.

    Also yes, I did decide to read this article solely because of the title.

    When I was in 4th grade, I don't think I knew what "road head" was. I grasped the concept of oral sex in general, but "sex" to me was still something that adults did when they really liked each other and they had an available bedroom. In a sense that's true, but I've come to learn that sex can be as meaningful or as meaningless as people want it to be, and it can happen wherever and however we want it to. That's a realization that, for me, was part of growing up. It's not something that I want my kids to know when they're 12. Maybe when they're 14. By 16, if they don't know it, there's something wrong with them.

    I don't think people should know the intricacies of sex until they're old enough to actually have it.

    Advertisements that use sex to sell products are actually a very bad idea. They don't work. When a guy sees a hot chick, he doesn't remember what was being sold, but damn does he remember dat ass. And everyone knows that drinking Fanta doesn't summon attractive women, and using Secret at the gym won't get you the hottie with the six pack, and the Biebs can't teleport (and even if he could, I doubt he would want to have sex with the screechy 12-year-olds that drool all over his posters). The point of incorporating beautiful people into advertisements seems to have been lost some time ago. Would that we could go back to the days of Mad Men, when advertisements were simpler, and a smiling, fully clothed girl was all that was needed...

    ...Oh, who am I kidding, I just wanna bang Don Draper.

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